At Allyn & Bacon, we're always interested in hearing about new ideas for textbooks. Since 1868, we have enjoyed a proud tradition of quality and excellence in publishing. Our editorial, marketing, and production staffs are committed to publishing books that make a difference, and our recent successes have ensured our position as an industry leader.

Developing a Prospectus and a Table of Contents

A prospectus is an invaluable tool that has a two-fold purpose: it gives you a chance to "sell" your book to us, and it clarifies the book for reviewers. A prospectus is of equal importance if the book is at the idea stage, or if sample chapters are being submitted.

I. PROJECT
  1. Brief Description
    In one or two paragraphs, describe the project, your rationale for writing it, approach, and biases (if any) toward the topic.

  2. Outstanding Features
    List briefly what you consider to be the outstanding, distinctive, or innovative features of the book.

  3. Apparatus
    Will the book include examples, cases, activities, strategies, teaching suggestions, glossaries, bibliographies, appendices, chapter summaries, questions, answer books, problem sets, student guide, instructor's manual, etc.?
II. MARKET CONSIDERATIONS
  1. Primary Markets

    1. College: In which college courses will this book be applicable? Are these introductory, undergraduate, or graduate courses? Would it be used as a basic text and/or a supplement?

    2. Professional Reference: Is the book suitable for purchase or personal reference? Who would purchase it -- teachers, administrators, nurses, engineers, etc.? Where are they likely to be located -- schools, business, hospitals, etc.?

  2. Secondary Markets
    Library, trade, foreign, etc.
III. COMPETITION
  1. Consider any existing books in this field and discuss their strengths and weaknesses. (If possible, supply title, author, publisher, date of publication, and number of pages.) How will your book be similar to, as well as different from, competing texts?

  2. Please discuss each competing book in a separate paragraph so that we will have some basis on which to compare your material. If no competitive book exists, try to cite a book that comes closest to your own.

IV. STATUS OF THE WORK
  1. What is your timetable for completing the book? What portion has been completed? When will sample chapters be available for review?

  2. What do you estimate to be the size of the completed book? (Double-spaced, typewritten pages normally reduce by approximately one-third when set in type. For example, 450 typewritten pages equal approximately 300 printed pages.)

  3. Will the book contain any photographs, line drawings, charts, graphs, diagrams, etc.? If so, approximately how many of each?

  4. Has your material been previously class tested, either in your own course or in any other sections, courses, schools, etc.?

V. VITA
Include a copy of your most recent vita or resume, listing degrees and previous publications (if any).

VI. TABLE OF CONTENTS
Include a detailed table of contents in outline form, incorporating headings and sub-headings. If possible, include a brief annotation or description of each chapter.

Example: CHAPTER 1: LOCATION SKILLS
A. Library Skills
1. Card Catalogues
2. Reference Books
3. Resource Materials
VII. SAMPLE MATERIAL
If you have begun writing, send two or three (or more) chapters for review. The chapters should be representative of the book, but not necessarily sequential.
VIII. COVER LETTER
Include where it is most convenient to reach you by telephone, mail, and e-mail.
IX. SEND IT TO US
Contact your local Allyn & Bacon/Longman representative and make arrangements to give them your Prospectus and Table of Contents. Use our Rep Locator to find your representative.
 
Next : Manuscript Development