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Information on the authors of Fundamentals of Sound
with Applications to Speech andHearing

William J. Mullin is Professor Emeritus of Physics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He has a PhD from Washington University/ St. Louis and has been at UMass since 1967. He originated a course, Physics of Sound, at UMass in 1973 for majors in the Communication Disorders Department and has taught it frequently. The classnotes from this course, contributed to by all the authors, developed into the text Fundamentals of Sound. Professor Mullin's research is in condensed matter physics, with specialties in quantum fluids and solids. Among his publications is the physics text, Introduction to the Structure of Matter (with J. J. Brehm) Wiley, 1989.
Personal web site: http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~phys114/WilliamMullin.html

William J. Gerace is Professor of Physics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He has a PhD from Princeton University and has been at UMass since 1969. He has taught the course, Physics of Sound, several times. Professor Gerace's research is in problem solving and cognitive processes in learning math and physics. Among his publications is the six volume set Minds•On Physics (with W. J. Leonard, R. J. Dufresne, and J. P. Mestre) Kendall/Hunt Publishing 1998, 1999, 2000.
Personal web site: http://umperg.physics.umass.edu/about/groupMembers/gerace

José P. Mestre is Professor of Physics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He has a PhD from the University of Massachusetts and has been a faculty member at UMass since 1981. He has taught the course, Physics of Sound, several times. His research interests include cognitive studies of problem solving in physics with a focus on the acquisition and use of
knowledge by experts and novices. Most recently, his work has focused on investigating transfer of knowledge in science problem solving, applying research findings to the design of instructional strategies that promote active learning in large physics classes, and on developing physics curricula that promote conceptual development through problem solving. He has published numerous research and review articles on science teaching and learning, and has co-authored or co-edited fifteen books.
Personal web site: http://umperg.physics.umass.edu/about/groupMembers/mestre

Shelley L. Velleman is Assistant Professor of Communication Disorders at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She has a PhD from the University of Texas and has been a faculty member at UMass since 1998. She teaches the courses, Phonetic Processing, and Introduction to Speech Science. Professor Velleman's research is in developmental verbal dyspraxia. Among her publications are Making Phonology Functional: What Do I Do First? (C. Seymour, series editor) Butterworth-Heinemann Publishers 1998; and Resource Guide for Childhood Dyspraxia Singular (in preparations). Personal Web site: http://www.cs.amherst.edu/~djv/shelley.html

 

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